Quality of Life and Disability

June 2018: Rangaraju et al (2017) Comparison of 3-month stroke disability and quality of life across modified Rankin Scale categories. Interventional Neurology, 6, 36-41. https://doi.org/10.1159/000452634

One of the issues that continues to concern me is that we fail to consistently and routinely measure outcomes across a survivor’s recovery journey after stroke. If I were to experience a stroke here in Australia, would I have my own baseline data and/or measures across time documenting my recovery or otherwise? It’s highly, highly unlikely! Why is this the case, and in turn, how can we expect health funders to support what’s happening in facilities that support those affected by stroke?

Often health professionals will argue that the reason they’re not doing it is because of time: it just takes too much time to use standardised assessments! They may also argue that its better to spend time on interventions, not assessments! Whatever the excuse, here’s an article that has investigated a standardised assessment that takes just a split-second to reliably measure disability after stroke! The modified Rankin score (mRS), a very raw score, could be your “for starters” choice! Rangaraju et al (2017) investigated its association with quality of life. To find out what an mRS of 3 means, read what they found!

The article is freely available at  https://doi.org/10.1159/000452634. Please find my “humble opinion” below, or under the Journal Club 2018 pages with the same title.

5 thoughts on “Quality of Life and Disability

  1. As a person who has had a stroke, it concerns me that longitudinal outcomes are not measured too. I can tell you with absolute certainty that almost 9 years post-stroke my recovery outcomes are a LOT different to what anyone would have anticipated if they’d measured my outcomes 3 months post stroke or on discharge from out patient therapy 6 months post stroke. The recovery window is a convenient myth which serves only those holding the purse strings of health funding.

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