Walking After Stroke

Berg Balance Scale Predicts Walking

Louie DR & Eng JJ (2018) Berg Balance Scale score at admission can predict walking suitable for community ambulation at discharge from inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 50 (1), 37-44, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2280

One of my very favourite academic researchers is Janice Eng and I’m so excited, because, guess what; she’s a keynote speaker at the Stroke 2018 conference in Sydney next week. If you-re going, let’s try and catch up! Although I do realise this is a hugely challenging thing to do at scientific conferences.

Two of my very favourite topics, as CS followers will already know, are using standardised assessments to measure recovery after stroke and predicting recovery potential on the basis of stroke assessments.

So, in my humble opinion, this article is a hit for three very good reasons!

Why don’t we do this more? Why don’t we measure function at baseline or on admission to our services, and then, when we can, use that data to predict what is most likely to occur in most patients? We do this in almost every other aspect of our personal and professional lives. For example, when we calculate a housing loan with the bank, or put in the time and effort to apply for a job on the basis of our estimates on the chances we have of success. There’s more and more reason to do this in those recovering from stroke! These researchers have demonstrated you can use admission Berg Balance Scale data to predict mobility at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation.

This article is freely available. You can find the abstract in the 2018 Journal Club, and I’ve posted “humble opinion” below.  If you’re in Sydney next week, why not attend the Stroke 2018 conference? Hopefully I’ll see some of you there!

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