Falls and Acute Stroke

March 2019: Westerlind et al (In Press) Drug treatment, postural control and falls: An observational cohort study of 504 patients with acute stroke, the fall study of Gothenburg. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

As some of you might know, I have fairly strong opinions about our approaches to reducing the risk of falls, generally, and more specifically, reducing risk in those recovering from stroke. I challenge the applying of a zero tolerance to falls, because it assumes that risk-reduction is a unilateral approach; however, in those recovering from stroke, there is the competing demand of the benefits of getting up and about! Rarely are the two issues discussed in tandem. In those recovering from stroke, we already have a cohort known to have a higher-than-average risk of falls. So, does this mean we go all out to reduce the risk of falls? Yes, but only if consideration is given to the physical, cognitive and emotional benefits of getting up-and-out and about! So, to assist us in this, let’s better understand who is most at risk and why.

In this month’s Journal Club, Westerlind et al (In press) report on their investigation of the risk of falls in acute stroke, with a particular focus on its association with postural control, and in turn, the impact of drug treatment. In my humble opinion, their findings make for very interesting reading.

This article is not publicly available; but you can always contact the corresponding author for a copy if your library doesn’t have access to the APHR journal. To find the abstract, go to Journal Club 2019 tab and select Falls and Acute Stroke from the drop-down menu. “Humble Opinion” is added as comment to this post.

1 thought on “Falls and Acute Stroke

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.