Predicting Recovery After Stroke

April 2020 Journal Club

Reference: Stinear et al (2019) Prediction tools for stroke rehabilitation, Stroke 50(11), 3314-3322 DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.119.025696

Humble Opinion: I know! I’m back on one of my favourite topics again! Please forgive me – but, as these authors rightly point out:

“Clinicians rate the patient’s prognosis for functional recovery as the most important factor when considering discharge destination from the acute setting.”

I’ve often presented on the need to be able to predict recovery potential after stroke, and sometimes at my own peril! As those of you who have followed me for some time will know, its one of the reasons I’ve always kept a close eye on the publications of Cathy Stinear and Winston Byblow. The other reason is that both of them, alongside many others researchers, have focussed much of their academic careers investigating recovery after stroke. This publication is not research, but a narrative review. However, I think many of you will find it very interesting indeed. Not only do the authors work their way through many areas of potential dysfunction after stroke, they also explain, along the way, the nuances of what predicting recovery potential is, and is not, about. As is usually the case, the authors keep their discussion firmly set in the “real world” of clinicians, therapy, and most importantly, the people directly affected by stroke. Answers to the “so what” question is an ever-present thread in their discussion.

This review synthesises the evidence related to predicting recovery in independence and disability, upper limb function, walking, independent walking, community ambulation and swallowing. As the authors rightly point out, there’s not enough evidence yet, to review communication, cognition, depression, return to work and driving. If you’re interested in how best to predict recovery after stroke, then this is an article well worth reading in my humble opinion. At the very least, it will point you in the right direction. The article is not publicly available; therefore, if you can’t gain access via other means you may need to purchase it or contact the corresponding author. Because there’s no abstract, you’ll find the opening paragraph of the article posted under the Journal Club 2020 tab.

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