Category Archives: Goal Setting

Cognitive Rehabilitation

November 2017 Gamito et al (2017) Cognitive training on stroke patients via virtual reality-based serious games, Disability and Rehabilitation, 39(4), 385-388, DOI: 10.3109/09638288.2014.934925

I’m often asked: What interventions have proven efficacy to improve cognition outcomes after stroke? Or, put another way, if I need to do cognitive rehabilitation, what should I be doing? Good questions! There are many who claim to be doing cognitive rehabilitation, and they are keen to tell you what they do and why; however, there is very little research into what works and what doesn’t work. But fortunately, this is starting to change. This month’s journal article demonstrates that prescribing virtual reality-based serious games can improve attention and memory outcomes after stroke. If you’re interested in cognitive rehabilitation after stroke, this article is worth reading. For “humble opinion”, please go to Journal Club 2017 and select Cognitive Recovery from the drop down box. This article is not publicly available, but don’t forget that you can always email the corresponding author for a copy.

Caregivers and Stroke

September 2017: Krieger et al. (2017) Developing a complex intervention program for informal caregivers of stroke survivors: The Caregivers’ Guide. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 31(1), 146-156. DOI 10.1111/scs.12344

Yet again, I had the honour of presenting to therapists on stroke recovery; this time in Sydney. One of the questions we discussed at some length was the answer to the following question: “Whose stroke is it?” This is something I’ve been thinking a lot about in recent years. The processes of documenting stroke in health facilities clearly identifies the stroke as “belonging” to the facility, and yet, the actual stroke leaves the facility inside the head of the survivor. In fact, the long-term impact of stroke eventually falls almost entirely to the survivors and their families and carers. They are the people who carry the burden, who grieve the loss and who live with the stroke’s consequences and complications. As I say, “Whose stroke is it?”

I’ve selected this month’s journal article because these authors are reporting evidence about the impact of stroke on families and the benefits of well organised support framework for families and carers. You’ll find the article’s abstract and “Humble Opinion” in its usual place under this topic on the 2017 Journal Club page. This article is freely available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/scs.12344/full

Predicting Recovery

May 2017: Stinear et al (2017 In Press) Predicting recovery potential for individual stroke patients increases rehabilitation efficiency. Stroke, https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.015790

This is a topic that I have been thinking so much about in recent years. The evidence indicating a strong association between severity of upper limb dysfunction and long-term functional outcomes is compelling, and some of the principal contributors to this evidence are Drs Cathy Stinear, Winston Byblow and Alan Barber. All three live and work in the North Island of beautiful New Zealand. For many years now, they have headed up a team of researchers who continue to publish in health journals with high scientific integrity.

This article is yet another in their PREP series: Predicting Recovery Potential. However, what sets it apart is that it tests the PREP algorithm in the clinical workplace. It comes as no surprise that they have been able to demonstrate that the “PREP algorithm predictions modify therapy content and increase rehabilitation efficiency after stroke without compromising clinical outcome”. My congratulations go to these three amazing researchers. This article is well worth reading. You’ll find “Humble Opinion” in its usual place under this topic on the 2017 Journal Club page.