Category Archives: Upper Limb Recovery

Predicting Recovery

May 2017: Stinear et al (2017 In Press) Predicting recovery potential for individual stroke patients increases rehabilitation efficiency. Stroke, https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.015790

This is a topic that I have been thinking so much about in recent years. The evidence indicating a strong association between severity of upper limb dysfunction and long-term functional outcomes is compelling, and some of the principal contributors to this evidence are Drs Cathy Stinear, Winston Byblow and Alan Barber. All three live and work in the North Island of beautiful New Zealand. For many years now, they have headed up a team of researchers who continue to publish in health journals with high scientific integrity.

This article is yet another in their PREP series: Predicting Recovery Potential. However, what sets it apart is that it tests the PREP algorithm in the clinical workplace. It comes as no surprise that they have been able to demonstrate that the “PREP algorithm predictions modify therapy content and increase rehabilitation efficiency after stroke without compromising clinical outcome”. My congratulations go to these three amazing researchers. This article is well worth reading. You’ll find “Humble Opinion” in its usual place under this topic on the 2017 Journal Club page.

Self-Assessment After Stroke

March 2017: Törnbom et al  (2017) Self-Assessed Physical, Cognitive, and Emotional Impact of Stroke at 1 Month: The Importance of Stroke Severity and Participation. Journal of stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 26(1), 57-63, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2016.08.029

The last journal article I posted about on CS in December 2016, reported the prevalence of impairments after stroke; so this article seemed like a useful “other side of the coin” article to review for February 2017. In contrast to Lawrence et al, Törnbom et al give voice to the people directly affected by stroke. In the words of the authors, the “aims of this study were to describe the self-assessed physical, emotional, and cognitive impact of stroke. and to investigate associations with participation and stroke severity at 1 month poststroke”.

What is the actual experience of those who are recovering from stroke, and more particularly, those with a stroke-affected upper limb? Good question! Also, do the early self-assessments of their own experiences, have any association with what actually occurs one month down the track? If you want to know more, this article is well worth reading!

The PdF is freely available at: http://www.strokejournal.org/article/S1052-3057(16)30301-9/pdf To find the full reference, abstract and “humble opinion”, go to Journal Club 2017 and Self-Assessment After Stroke.